Forget HR! I’m Going To Work For Starbucks

Is the grass always greener on the other side? Not necessarily. But I can tell you when it comes to employee incentives, benefits and having executive advocates, the coffee may be stronger and sweeter on the other side…at Starbucks.

forget-hr-im-going-to-work-for-starbucks-a3da2Today I’m over at Performance I Create discussing how retention is no longer just about pay…it’s about emotion, support and advocacy. Once you find good employees, they have to be invested in, not just given stuff…as stuff fades away. Here’s a quick sample:

…most employees would be thrilled to even know that a President or CEO took the time to consider doing something for them…even if it couldn’t necessarily happen. Feeling like an employer is going to bat for them makes a huge difference in the way employees view the company. And those considerations and those thoughts go much further than just throwing some empty, non-relevant award someone’s way.

I hope that you enjoy the full post HERE and I asked that you share this post with any decision maker that may be struggling to keep great employees.

Check out my post and those of my fellow contributors for relevant, in-your-face, performance altering insight at Performance I Create!

Workplace Astigmatism

For the last 10 years, I’ve boasted that my vision has not changed. I laugh at optometrists when I walk into their examination rooms because I know that the result is going to be the same…”Well Mr. Harris, everything is fine…no difference…here’s your prescription.” to which I say buttholishly, “I know! Told ya things are the same.”

eye-exam-checkupBecause of this status quo, I take eye exams for granted; only going when I actually need new glasses due to wear and tear…which is like every 5 years. I actually get tired of putting myself (and my money) out there to have my time wasted…until my visit a week ago.

This trip I entered confidently as I usually do, preparing my normal giggle and forming my mouth to say my usual know-it-all words, until Dr. Eyedude says, “Your right eye has changed. We’re going to switch your prescription and it may be a little drastic.”

When you think that nothing has changed, everything has

Not having had to look through “different” lenses for so long, I found myself being uncomfortable on my way home. The change was making my head hurt. Things were blurry. I didn’t like it. Was it because it was unexpected? Was it because something was different? Was it because it was unwelcomed? Maybe it was because I had gotten too comfortable. Too used to knowing what everything looked like and how everything was supposed to feel. The moment a new process was introduced, a new person was brought aboard, a new policy took effect…wait, am I describing your office or my eyes? Hmm? Maybe both.

As we get older, more experienced, more tenured, we must face the inevitable fact that things must and will change. Our vision, our surroundings, and the ways our businesses must operate all change. We can either roll with it, adjust or we can resist and remain in denial. That denial stems from the fact that we think things are fine just the way they are and we think that if we don’t acknowledge it, it’ll just go away.

Resistance to change can be costly

If I had paid regular attention, not been so arrogant and stubborn, maybe a drastic change could have been avoided or eased into. The gradual change would’ve helped me to make better adjustments. Being open to changes in the way our companies must do business will help our employees make better decisions as it relates to the new normals. Maybe they need regular examinations and consultation…I mean evaluations and one-on-ones…so that any issues can be identified early before they become problematic and cost us in the end.

What’s better? One or two? Two or three?

The next day, I could see things better. The headache had gone away. Those moments of temporary discomfort turned into my new, clearer reality. It took me getting broken down and taken out of my cocky comfort zone to realize that acceptance, flexibility and acknowledgement helped the headaches to go away and for things to seem clear again. I had to be humbled by the fact that I don’t know how bad things are until someone shows me something better, different, clearer.

Does your job give you “headaches”? Is it them or is it you refusing to adapt? 

Let’s not wait until it’s too late to let someone check us out. Let’s take some feedback and let it make us better. Let’s understand that us becoming more seasoned is when more changes need to occur…as opposed to things always having to change to our liking. Yielding to necessary adjustments may be blurry at first, but it can ultimately help you to see your vision more clearly in the end.

Make Good Business Decisions, Not Popular Ones

I believe that the most difficult part of being a true leader is the ability to make the tough call even when it meets resistance. Do we tell people untruths to avoid hurting their feelings? Do we avoid negative but necessary feedback in order to keep people “engaged”? Yeah, it happens all of the time…and at the same time it’s doing that person a disservice as they don’t know that they need to do better and our places of business suffer from a false sense of success.

Today I am over at Performance I Create, where we dive a little deeper into the issue of worrying more about image than the true success of those we are chosen to lead. Here is a quick sample:

whatrightnot-easy…those in power want to seem like heroes/heroines and good guys, but we must be careful not to make critical business moves based on popularity alone. The temporary spike in popularity will crash even harder when the audience sees that the promises can’t be fulfilled or that the decision has actually made things worse. My advice to decision makers is simple…

I hope that you enjoy the full post HERE and I asked that you share this post with anyone that you know who is struggling with being liked versus being effective.

Check out my post and those of my fellow contributors for relevant, in-your-face, performance altering insight at Performance I Create!

Workplace Diversity Isn’t Enough – Let’s Ramp Up Inclusion

Today I am over at Performance I Create discussing Diversity and Inclusion. We typically see these two terms in the same sentence used interchangeably, but it is so very possible to have one without the other. Here is a sample:

I’d be remiss if I didn’t say that there is much more to do. Remember, much of the diversity we see is the result of mandates and legislation, not out of truly trying to represent our communities and client bases.  While the snapshot of our organizations looks good and rainbowy, are we treating everyone with respect once they are in the door…or behind closed doors?

FullSizeRender (1)Just when we think that we’ve come so far, we get reminders of how much more is needed in our society. When this post was originally published at PIC a few days ago using the hashtag #Diversity, I received this tweet that makes me want to spread the message of Inclusion even more.

I hope that you enjoy the full post HERE and I asked that you share and promote the good work that some of our organizations are doing and are trying to do as it relates to being Inclusive.

Check out my post and those of my fellow contributors for relevant, in-your-face, performance altering insight at Performance I Create!

Leadership Position, Follower Mindset

I see a lot of things in my line of work. Organizational issues, backbiting and fighting, several people that need to shut up and sit down, but more importantly, people in leadership positions that need to stand up…and actually lead.

Leadership-Quotes-33Today at PerformanceICreate.com, I’m discussing how critical it is for a person in a decision-making role to command the respect of their peers and coworkers by not only talking a good game, but by having the right mindset and taking the right actions. Here is a sample:

Leadership requires seeing the field from a broader view. Being able to recognize things when those who are in the trenches don’t or can’t. As an employee, I must be able to trust the person that I’m following knows where we are going and how to get there…and at the very least knows how to find out quickly if they don’t…

Click HERE for the full article and please share!

Check out my post and those of my fellow contributors for relevant, in-your-face, performance altering insight at Performance I Create!

A P.I.P. Shouldn’t Be An R.I.P.

It’s so easy to say that employees should just go away when they’re not performing the way we want them to or responding to our management. The hard part is not actually getting them to change behavior, it’s actually admitting that we can do more to get them to where they should be.

image1PIPs or Performance Improvement Plans are often used by companies as the last ditched effort to shape up those “troubled” employees before we ship them out. Others use them as merely a coaching tool to get the attention of their people so that other forms of disciplinary action doesn’t have to be taken. I’ve seen PIPs in memo form, worksheets and templates, and I’ve even seen them delivered in emails. But regardless of how we format them, they should all have the same elements to be effective:

  • Clear areas that our employees need improve upon to remain a part of our teams
  • Challenging, yet achievable goals and deadlines for expected improvement
  • A plan of action for achievable said goals
  • Steps in which the manager can contribute and help the employee reach optimal performance
  • Fair and consistently applied actions that will occur if the desired performance isn’t met

We cannot use the word “Improvement” in the plan if we are not truly trying to achieve it. How we communicate during the delivery, and the words and tone used during the meeting should not feel like a death sentence or as if we are setting the employee up to fail.

There is no need to rehash the issues that we’ve had with the employee, but should focus on the behaviors that cause those issues that need to be altered or adjusted. Bringing up old stuff, especially if those incidents have caused negative conflict before, will surely turn your performance improvement meeting into a counter-productive blame session where no one is listening.

If we want our employees to listen, they must feel as if they are believed in, like they can make it and that they are being supported by members of management. Not only is this communicated in the document and meetings themselves, but by actually following up frequently to ensure that the necessary steps in the plan are being acted on.

So ultimately, a lot of the responsibility comes back to the manager. Not just delivering a document so that we can check a box, but managing our employees to yield the results that we need.

And isn’t that what management is all about? Not just supervising processes and expecting everyone to fall in line, but by providing resources and teaching people how to be successful in our systems.

Joe ClarkIf we want to get rid of someone, let’s just do it and move on to the next. Like Joe Clark said in the movie Lean On Me, “Don’t f#&% around with it…do it expeditiously!” But if we actually want them to get better, we must communicate it, make them believe it and show them how serious we are about them making it through the process.

When The Phone Stops Ringing

I so often hear complaints about the amount of calls and questions we get in our Human Resources departments, but what if they stopped coming? 

I’m guilty sometimes too. From time to time I let out a huge sigh or say, “What now?!?!” before I pick up the phone, but I remind myself quickly of one major thing before I answer it to get me in the right head space. Human Resources should be the epitome of Customer Service.

Clients (internal or external) don’t constantly call people they don’t trust or can’t depend on. Every call we get is an opportunity to not only help make a difference, but an opportunity to put our offices on the positive map and boost confidence in our service.

We teach customer service to company employees, but we aren’t exempt from delivering the same level of treatment that we preach. We should welcome the calls and questions, as being the first line of defense helps eliminate the issues where we are the last line of defense. When responding to client issues, it’s important for us to not sound as if we are doing them a favor or as if we are being inconvenienced…because it’s far more inconvenient when we have to deal with escalated situations that could have been avoided had we gotten involved sooner.

Remembering these things helps me to clear up that little attitude I may have before answering calls and reminds me to answer that phone or reply to that email with the very level of service that I expect when I reach out to someone for help. 

Even when we don’t think that we operate in a Customer Service role, everything we do…and more importantly how we do things affects and impacts someone else. This huge responsibility is motivation to be the resource that we have been called to be to our employees and in our organizations. Making someone else’s day will almost always help to make yours as well.

ringing-phoneWhen the phone stops ringing and the email notifications are no longer popping up, it could quite possibly mean that we are no longer on the radar…that what we have to say is no longer welcomed or relevant in the eyes of our public, or that no one wants to deal with us because we are just plain rude. And when we are no longer relevant and no one is depending on us for the answers or assistance, we have at some point failed and fallen short of our purpose, which should include treating every person as a valued customer while contributing positively to the bottom lines of our companies.